WP Forum: Should the left support sanctions against Iran?

September 19, 2008

Much has been made by the corporate media and Western governments over the threat supposedly represented by Iran’s civilian nuclear program (despite the CIA themselves admitting that there is no evidence at all the Iranian government is developing nuclear weapons). Many ostensibly “progressive” people (including our own Labour government) have backed UN sanctions against the Iranian regime, yet remain conspicuously silent on the issue of Israel’s already developed arsenal of nuclear weapons.

Is it simply a case of the left needing to be more consistent in its policy of intervention, or should we instead uphold the right of the Iranian people themselves to overthrow their regime without interference from Western interests?

Come along to this month’s Christchurch Workers Party forum, where we discuss these questions as well as what Iranian leftists themselves are doing to oppose both the threat of US military intervention and their own government as well.

Wednesday September 24, 7pm

Workers Educational Association, 59 Gloucester St


All Welcome!


Christchurch WP election campaign launch

July 24, 2008

7pm, Monday, July 28

WEA, 59 Gloucester St

Meet local WP candidates Byron Clark (Christchurch Central) and Paul Hopkinson (Christchurch East).

Food, drinks and revolutionary politics.


Protest against Condoleezza Rice

July 23, 2008

US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is visiting Auckland from Friday 25 July to Sunday 27 July. 

 She is the public face of US imperialism. 

 She is meeting Helen Clark and Winston Peters at Government House on Saturday 26th July.

 Protest March to government house

Meet at the corner of Carlton Gore Road and Park Road

1.30pm

Saturday 26th July

 This will be followed by a protest from 3.15pm outside the Langham Hotel in Symonds Street where she is scheduled to meet National Party Leader John Key.

 Protest co-ordinated by Global Peace and Justice Auckland.


Zimbabwe elections – a vote for change

April 29, 2008

- Alastair Reith

Leader of the Zimbabwean opposition Movement for Democratic Change, Morgan Tsvangirai

On 29 March 2008, the people of Zimbabwe went to the polls to vote in the parliamentary and presidential elections, and on the future of their impoverished country.

There was world-wide interest in the elections and a great deal of media coverage. These elections were seen as crucial in determining whether President Robert Mugabe and his ruling ZANU-PF party would maintain their 28-year hold on power, or whether the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) would take their place.

The elections were marred by violent clashes between the supporters of various parties and factions, and were carried out in an atmosphere of extreme tension.

Official results began to trickle in on March 31. By April 2 all the results for the lower House of Assembly had been declared, with the majority faction of the MDC, led by Morgan Tsvangirai, winning 99 seats, Mugabe’s ZANU-PF winning 97, the minority MDC faction led by Arthur Mutambara winning 10 seats, and one independent.

This was the first time since the end of white minority rule that Mugabe’s party had not held a majority, and it showed the level of dissatisfaction with him that exists in Zimbabwe.

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